Category Archives: Medicinal

Rubus ursinus | California blackberry | Edible and Medicinal Uses

View photos of the edible and medicinal plant, Rubus ursinus (California blackberry), profiled in the Wild Edible Series: California.

A passage from Wild Edible Plants of California:

When ripe, Blackberry fruit (not an actual berry but a drupe) are dark purple to black, and usually smaller than store–bought. They are sweet, mildly tart, and delicious when gathered from a healthy and well–hydrated specimen.

Pinus monophylla | Singleleaf pinyon | Edible and Medicinal Uses

View photos of the edible and medicinal plant Pinus monophylla (Singleleaf pinyon), profiled in the Wild Edible Series: Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah.

A passage from Wild Edible Plants of Arizona:

Pinyon pines’ seeds (or ‘nuts’) are larger than other Pine species, which makes them a worthwhile wild food.

A passage from Wild Edible Plants of California:

Pinus monophylla is found from the Transverse and Peninsular Ranges and inter–desert mountains to the east side of the Sierras.

A passage from Wild Edible Plants of Utah:

The seeds are very nutritious, fine–tasting, and need no preparation, aside from shelling. They are the wild American version of European pine nuts found in commerce.

Hydrocotyle verticillata | Marsh pennywort | Edible and Medicinal Uses

View photos of the edible and medicinal plant, Hydrocotyle verticillata (Marsh pennywort), profiled in the Wild Edible Series: California and Texas.

A passage from Wild Edible Plants of the California:

California is home to five species of Pennywort, though only three are widespread or regionally abundant. A wetland/riparian (freshwater) plant, look for Pennywort on the edges of slow–moving (or stagnant) bodies of water/marshes.

A passage from Wild Edible Plants of the Texas:

The raw immature leaves are eaten as a salad, used as a garnish, or steamed–sautéed if in need of a cooked green. Raw, the leaves have a refreshing hint–of–celery taste. The older leaves may be a little tough and slightly bitter.